For the first time in history a paedophile will be chemically castrated in kazakhistan.

According to the Mirror, this comes following a new law which was passed permitting the method as punishment for paedophilia.

According to officials, the unnamed man from the Turkestan region is to undergo an injection supervised by the country’s health ministry.

The procedure involves using chemicals to deactivate the testes and reduce libido and therefore sexual activity.

President of the country, Nursultan Nazarbayev, has allocated £20,500 ($27,000) for some 2,000 injections on men who commit child sex attacks this year.

Deputy health minister, Lyazzat Aktayeva, told the Mirror: “At the moment there has been one request for chemical castration in accordance with a court ruling.”

“Funds have been allocated for more than 2,000 injections.”

When the law was passed, at the start of the year, senator Byrganym Aitimova said that castration would be ‘temporary’, consisting of a ‘one-time injection’ based on ‘the necessity of preventing the man from (committing) sexual violence’.

Child sex crimes also carry prison sentences of up to 20 years in Kazakhstan.

The procedure may not prevent a person from experiencing sexual urges indefinitely but it reduces them.

According to reports, child rapes in the country doubled to around 1,000 per year over a four year period between 2010 and 2014.

Kazakhstan officials will use Cyproterone, a steroidal anti-androgen developed for fighting cancer, say reports.

Back in 2015, disturbing statistics were revealed which were carried out by the National Crime Agency, suggesting that as many as one in every 35 adult males is a potential paedophile.

According to the Telegraph, although two thirds of those attracted to children would never act on their urges directly, increasing numbers of men are turning to the internet to seek out sick images of child abuse.

The National Crime Agency estimated that in 2015, 750,000 men living in Britain had an interest in having sex with children, with 250,000 sexually attracted to children under the age of 12.

The NSPCC recently warned that as many as one million children in the UK could have been the victim of an assault, but most crimes are never reported or investigated.

Writing in the Mail on Sunday, Karen Bradley, the minister tasked with preventing abuse and exploitation, said: “The internet gives such people anonymity. They can go online and be somebody else. The internet normalises this behaviour because people with this interest find other who share their interest.”